Powdery Mildew Identification, Management, and Prevention

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Powdery Mildew Garden Guide

In this guide you will find:
What Is Powdery Mildew?
How Do I Know If I Have Powdery Mildew?
How to Get Rid of Powdery Mildew
Can I Get Rid of Powdery Mildew Naturally?
Can I Prevent Powdery Mildew?

 

What Is Powdery Mildew?

Identification. Powdery mildew is a fungus that is a common disease of many plants.  There are many different species, each attacking a specific plant.

How Do I Know If I Have Powdery Mildew?

Damage.  There are several telltale signs that Powdery Mildew may be attacking your plants.  Here’s what to look for.

Initially white powdery spots are visible on leaves, stems, flowers, or fruit, which will gradually spread.

Infected leaves may turn yellow and die or may be distorted.

How to Get Rid of Powdery Mildew

Control. There are fungicides on the market that will either help to prevent or to eradicate a new powdery mildew infection.  Prevention measures should only be used when necessary and on plants that are susceptible to the infection.

Can I Get Rid of Powdery Mildew Naturally?

 

Biological Agents. There are natural products on the market that contain biological agents that work to enhance a plant’s health to help resist infection.  These biological agents are also used to compete with plant pathogens. For example, Serenade contains a strain of bacillus subtilis, which is beneficial bacterial.

 

Oils.  Horticultural oils, such as SAF-T-SIDE® Horticultural Oil, have a variety of uses including its use as a fungicide.  Oils work by interfering with the attachment of the pathogen to the host and also works as a suffocant to already present pathogens.

Can I Prevent Powdery Mildew?

Prevention. Purchase plant cultivars that are resistant to powdery mildew.

Powdery mildew infections are more severe in shaded areas so plant vegetation in sunny areas.

Give plants plenty of spacing for good air circulation.

Use drip irrigation rather than overwatering to avoid water splash spreading the spores.

Susceptible plants such as cucumbers, melons, squashes, and pumpkins can be treated with a fungicide as a preventative measure.

Remove diseased plants to discourage reinfection.

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